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20121202
20121210
SHOW
Book TV 11
STATION
CSPAN2 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 7:00pm EST
science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carson could explore the was often wi
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
is my wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pol
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:30am EST
to be. whatever, science, history will all be harder. maybe you get to nap without reading and maybe not. if your kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about looks, the great and terrific thing is there's so many really good books out there for them to read. there's a lot of books that will absolutely blow the minds of your kid. you know, harry potter, terrific series. when the kids come and terrific illustrations. books about sports, fine. if you have boys, let them read anything. , looks, great, graphic novels, almanacs, cut books, share, why not. as long as they are reading because to get better at it. i'll go to schools and say who play soccer? who love soccer? the outcome of the. you better know? would play a lot. same with reading. he read more, get better at it. it gets easier. you read better books. you have something that you love. so i though the will to get that in your hands that notion we read in our hou
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over t
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
. >> economics, science of explaining where all the money went. the field of economics is divided into two main categories , microeconomics with examines why stephanie was here a minute ago and macro, with such a the economy as a whole to determine have that much money can this be done . analyzed it to study wine making money to replace the money the disappeared is not going to work. the best course of action is to reject the idea that the money is really down and carry on like nothing happened. other theories argued the only way to fix this is-the people at the most money to share with everyone else. except that money is never coming back and everybody pantages to use to it. >> bill clinton. let's do it. >> bill clinton, 42nd president of the united states his popular appeal nearly provoked house republicans to impeach him for conduct in his personal life, an unprecedented move that would have made a mockery of the u.s. constitution and was therefore quickly dismissed as a level with the time. a self-described new democrat he sets his policies would have been only the second president to face
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
choosing your capitalist. there was one of those typical, business and social science. one of those typical varieties of capitalism's. they have a nicer capitalism in the street. we have a more rampant cowboy capitalist. and a very myopic kind of discussion because it failed to see the extent to which european capitalism has become so americanized. you know, the european union is more open, if anything, to much of what we have been discussing in terms of free capital flows and deregulation than any other. so it has been in myopic discussion. but i think everyone now does recognize this is the capitol system. and hopefully people will get beyond looking for a better variety of capitalism and use the kind of democratizing language your speaking of to try to get to somewhere else. get to a better society that is not structured in terms of capitalist social relations and the drive to capital. >> do things. [inaudible] agreed to help and to privatize so that they stand aside. create our own. [indiscernible] >> yes. i think a central theme of the book is, to some extent, the type of reforms. for
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:45pm EST
was allowed to travel abroad and he went to berkeley to study clinical sciences and 18-year-old unfair to oxford in 1970 was then returned to pakistan he began to work as a lawyer, that he began to make his name in karachi circles at least. he married -- you pretty merit rather my grandmother. it was a love marriage and their parents oppose. they'll vote. >> your family has to rein in marriage? >> yes, they had lived in bombay and had come over during partition and she was from a shia family, so they didn't quite like the sound of that. svea loped and married and their first child was born soon after. a year after that another daughter followed was quite soon after that but he began his career in politics. >> and he was executed in what year? >> in 1979. >> so your father was at what age when his father was executed? >> he was 25 when his father was killed. the government has been overthrown two years before that when my father was 23 and financier would have been 24. they spent two years fighting for clemency for their father. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to ame
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)